1. fastcompany:

Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.
Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.
Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

    fastcompany:

    Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.

    Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.

    Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

    1 year ago  /  36 notes  /  Source: fastcodesign.com

  2. Cool Jobs for Cool People

    Epic Application Analyst

    Backend Developer

    Web Developer

    1 year ago  /  0 notes

  3. .Net Developer Web Developer

    Great Opportunities, Cool companies, Awesome technolgies, SE Michigan

    Who do you know?

    squaiatto@gobrightwing.com

    1 year ago  /  0 notes

  4. 2 years ago  /  0 notes

  5. Any Developers who need a cool job in Southeast Michigan

    Not just any job!  We have some really cool jobs, like work from home in your pj jobs.  Jobs where you make a lotta money so you can buy more lattes or whatever.  Jobs using your technical and/or creative mind.   If you like to go to work in jeans or shorts and flip flops in the summer I have the job for you.  If you like to work in a stuffy big corporate office I have those jobs too.  Looking for entry level to Sr. level developers who can communicate and explain with confidence their skills and abilities.  Even if you don’t know a certain technology you can learn it quickly right?! The answer is yes!

    So get a job get a cool car and a girlfriend/boyfriend and a slurpee or a latte whatever you are into. 

    Funny

    2 years ago  /  1 note

  6. thenextweb:

    Developer Scott Garner has created a still life painting that isn’t so still. The piece utilizes Unity 3D (a game development tool), motion sensors and a basic C application to recreate gravity. So if you tilt the painting, the items in the piece magically tumble over — like it’s right out of the Harry Potter series. (via Interactive Still Life Proves That Code is Art)

    2 years ago  /  41 notes  /  Source: thenextweb.com

  7. tommypom:

tommy.

    tommypom:

    tommy.

    2 years ago  /  254 notes  /  Source: tommypom

  8. 2 years ago  /  0 notes